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Cling

Cling considers satellite dishes installed on buildings for their formal similarities to barnacles growing on a rock; as barnacles encrust a rock, satellites encrust a building. Satellite dishes are notable for their purpose as sites of transmission between space satellites, personal electronic devices, and the sublime realm of the digital world; barnacles for their ability to colonize and grow on any available surface.

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Traversing the line, with no fixed point

Briana Palmer gathers images, objects, and ideas from the everyday, exploring the intersections between the perception, experience, and social ideologies of her own cultural practices and upbringing. Traversing the line, with no fixed point unsettles our assumptions of place and belonging. The main component of the installation is the “Iron horse” – a railway system that runs through an installation of ephemera, nostalgic paraphernalia, and cultural artifacts.

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Timber, Lumber, Wood, Home

Fern Helfand creates an observation point for viewers to contemplate how our environment, our society, and our very identity is being modified by resource use. Her work records the way we clear the land, build our homes, choose our materials, and shelter ourselves. It pushes the boundaries of photography beyond straight documentary images by merging multiple photographs and videos into composite creations.

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Second Nature: Resilience

Second Nature: Resilience focuses on normally invisible fluctuations and all the small shifts that secretly, inexorably, add up to epic transformations. This video installation depicts an abandoned house in the forest gradually collapsing as time, nature, animals, and the elements take over and ultimately transform it.

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And Even Dust Can Burst into Flames

Genevieve Robertson’s drawings involve extensive physical exploration and are materially linked to specific regions and their land and resource politics. This body of drawings uses pigments made with found carbon-based materials—coal, graphite, ash and wildfire-derived charcoal—collected in the East and West Kootenays where coal and graphite mining take place and climate-induced wildfires are increasing in severity.

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Stratigraphy

stra·tig·ra·phy 1. the branch of geology concerned with the order and relative position of strata and their relationship to the geological time scale. The term “stratigraphy” is primarily used by geologists and focuses on the study of rock layers to investigate what occurred historically in an area. In addition, the term is used by archaeologists to identify the contents of strata in order to create a picture of the human culture that lived during a particular time.

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Grand Theft Terra Firma

Grand Theft Terra Firma is an unflinching redress of Canada’s colonial narrative. By combining contemporary popular culture with historical source material, artists David Campion and Sandra Shields disrupt the celebratory mythology of nation building and invite us to critically evaluate our own continued and complicated relationship to colonial practices.

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Fine Line: Check Check - Ian Johnston

In Check Check, the ubiquity of the self-doubting individual is inextricably linked to a mass culture marked by distrust of the very mass media that gives it shape. Stepping into a space intersected by four large projection screens, the viewer is surrounded on all sides by a looping series of vignettes, screened variously in fragments and in their entirety and accompanied by a four-channel score from composer Don MacDonald.

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Iconic Places, Artistic Traces

See depictions of place represented in the permanent collection of Gallery 2. From the iconic to the ironic, the way artists depict locality is both deeply personal and more widely contextual. The permanent collection contains a wide range of landscape work; featuring both regionally specific, recognizable landmarks as well as conceptually exploring the larger idea of landscape.

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Observer, Observed

In Observer, Observed, Meghan Krauss documents masses of tourists condensing together within each of the panoramic photographs in the exhibition. Compressed together, these people are all equally enthusiastic to be documenting the same picturesque landscapes, regardless of the quality of images taken or on what social platforms they will ultimately be displayed.

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